Psychology & Society
Psychology & Society


Current Issue - April 2020

 



To be or not to be wounaan-nonam: a reflection on the identity in cultural semiotic constructivism
HERNÁN SÁNCHEZ RIOS & LIVIA MATHIAS SIMÃO

The main purpose of this article is to make a reflection on the identity based on the perspective designated Cultural Semiotic Constructivism in Psychology. The psychological identity is approached as a complex construction that gives sense to the discourse of three indigenous leaders wounaan-nonam (banks of San Juan River, Colombia). The analysis of the discourse reveals, in each community leader, a subjectivity identified as wounaan-nonam, initially by the assimilation of the system of values which organizes the indigenous community, simultaneously to the confrontation of personal experiences which have a nebulous affective impact on the encounter with the other: neighbour, outsider or foreigner, in the humid rainforest. From this encounter arises a disquieting experience which makes way for the notion of otherness and highlights a central thesis of CSC: the identity arises from the negotiation between the personal culture and the collective culture in the complex relationship I-the other-world.

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Militant Irishness – Examining Irish Diaspora Support for Republican Paramilitaries in Boston and New York as a Potential Strategy for Reaffirming Irishness Abroad
CARMEL JOYCE & ORLA LYNCH

The Irish diaspora in the US have proven to be powerful transnational players who arguably perpetuated civil conflict in their homeland, while also being instrumental in its resolution (Bird, 2016). While peripheral support of militant groups is a potential strategy for reaffirming their Irish national identity abroad (Wilson, 1995), little is known about how such individuals construct their Irishness in light of the geo-political shifts (i.e., the peace process in Northern Ireland and domestic terrorism in the US). To address this empirical gap, interviews were conducted with 21 active members and 11 past members of Northern Irish Aid Committee (NORAID) an organization in the US that was set up to support the dependents of imprisoned Catholics in Northern Ireland. A discursive analysis revealed the temporal disconnect between distant generation Irish Americans’ use of micro-politics of the past to substantiate their identity claims and first-generation Irish who point to an increasingly globalized Northern Ireland. The implications are discussed in terms of how dissident Republican groups could potentially exploit this disconnect by encouraging individuals to seek identity continuity through their support of those who ideologically oppose peace.

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